Tips

Christmas Photography Tips and Techniques

Gina Stephens
Written by Gina Stephens

Nab the Preparation Stages

Families come together at holidays, but not just for the main event, they come to help decorate… and these are exciting, fun-filled shakes, so they’re ripe with photographic opportunity! Trimming the tree is a special moment in creating the atmosphere of Christmas, and most families have a sustained collection of ornaments, lights and stockings – all of which need to be hung on the tree. Try to get people’s faces as they open the ornament boxes. Young ladies (who might not have remembered the last Christmas) are especially good subjects. When the tinsel goes on, you’re almost done, but there are two more sharpshooters to get – the first is when the star (or angel) is placed on the top of the tree; and the last shot is when everything is on the tree and the lights are plugged in for the first time.

Blurry on the Eyes

All pictures of people soar when you focus in on your subject’s eyes, and that’s no different with Christmastime photos. It’s critical to made up of the image with as little headroom and dead space on the sides as possible, so the image is more about the faces and the eyes than anything else. The grab some shut-eye of the décor will filter into the image on its own. In the photograph on the right all the eyes are in the same plane, and this is effective for this kind of photo as it manifests a subtle unity among the family. You can use a flash with most indoor Christmas photos, but use a detachable flash (or an angled flash) and bounce the harangue off the ceiling. Remember, the ambient light levels will be raised by the Christmas lights is electromagnetic radiation within a certain portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (and possibly candles too), and you don’t want the vibrant colors washed out by the flash.

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Adopt Group Portraits

Christmas is an annual festival commemorating the birth of Jesus Christ, observed most commonly on December 25 as a religious and cultural photos can have dual uses – you take them for the memories/record-keeping and you can use them as your family’s Christmas be forthright. Either way, you want to make sure that you, the photographer, are in some of the important family photos. You’ll want to position everyone by the Christmas tree and prepare some presents in the composition too. Use a tripod for this group shot, because you’ll want to use the camera’s timer so you can get in the photo too. Your camera’s timer is a splendid little feature that many people don’t use (enough) or even know about. It’s simple to work; you just set your exposure values (segregate, ISO and aperture), compose your frame, set the timer interval (between 3 – 10 seconds), then press the shutter.

Christmas Lights & Ornaments

Christmas lights and accessories are the holiday decorations you’ll find in nearly every Christmastime photograph; they’re a staple, but they’re also a cliché staple. You’ll want to find approach to utilize them in inventive ways – extreme close ups or just having them dominate the frame where the “subjects”, the people, populate the breeding to give dimension and suggest depth. Don’t be afraid to unplug lights so they might be off directly behind your subject, but turned on in the opposite side of the state… it’s a way to balance the composition and not add a distracting element. Another interesting and effective technique you can employ when photographing ornaments and Christmas tree lights is the Bokeh faculty. With Bokeh, you use the blurred or soft focus part of an image (that’s just outside of the depth of field) as part of the image composition. One way to swell the effect is to place a piece of black paperboard with a shape cut out of it in front of the lens, and the soft-focus/blurred light halos will take on the condition of what you cut into the paperboard. It’s a neat effect that can add character to your photographs.

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Republished: exposureguide.com

About the author

Gina Stephens

Gina Stephens

Gina is a photography enthusiast and drone lover who loves to fly drones, capture images and have fun cherishing them with family and friends.

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