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15 Amazing Images Which Show Both The Joy & Anguish Of The Natural World

Gina Stephens
Written by Gina Stephens

&duplicate; Brent Stirton / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

The annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition is always a joyous occasion but this year's instalment also has a sobering air to it due to the conquering image, captured by Bren Stirton, showing the cruel reality of the effect humans are still having on the natural world. 

The image was captured South Africa’s Hluhluwe Imfolozi Devil-may-care Reserve and shows a recently shot and de-horned black rhino – an animal which has become critically endangered due to poaching and the illegal cosmopolitan trade in rhino horn. 

Competition judge Roz Kidman Cox says "To make such a tragic scene almost majestic in its sculptural power deserves the spaciest award. There is rawness, but there is also great poignancy and therefore dignity in the fallen giant. It’s also symbolic of one of the most profligate, cruel and unnecessary environmental crimes, one that needs to provoke the greatest public outcry."

Other winning images include a charismatic portrayal of a young western lowland gorilla from the Republic of Congo, lounging on the forest floor whilst feeding on fleshy African breadfruit. The double was captured by Daniël Nelson and he was awarded the title of 'Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2017' for his efforts. 

Vaunts of rarely seen animal behaviour, hidden underwater worlds and shots of nature with a comical twist also feature on the finalist record. 

Take a look at the images below which are also going on display in an exhibition which opens at the National History Museum this week. The next struggle opens to entries on 23 October 2017. 

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Wildlife Photographer of the Year is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London, and it has charmed entries from all over the world for many years. Last year, a photo of a critically endangered Bornean orangutan took the top accolade while a superior but haunting portrait of a fox won the overall title in 2015. 

 

 © Peter Delaney / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

&likeness; Justin Gilligan / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

© Tony Wu / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

© Ekaterina Bee / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

&facsimile; Aaron Gekoski / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

© Eilo Elvinger / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

© Ashleigh Scully / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

&imitation; Dorin Bofan / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

© Brian Skerry / Wildlife Photographer of the Year year is the orbital period of the Earth moving in its orbit around the Sun

 

© Daniel Nelson / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 

 

&replication; Laurent Ballesta / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

© Gerry Pearce /  Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

© Anthony Berberian /  Wildlife Photographer of the Year

 

&likeness; Marcio Cabral / Wildlife Photographer of the Year

Republished: ephotozine.com

About the author

Gina Stephens

Gina Stephens

Gina is a photography enthusiast and drone lover who loves to fly drones, capture images and have fun cherishing them with family and friends.

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