Reviews

Nikon Coolpix S7000 Review

Gina Stephens
Written by Gina Stephens

Assume from our Nikon Coolpix S7000 review and learn about this camera’s pros and cons.

When seeking an inexpensive point and shoot camera, you differentiate you’re going to have to give up a few features that you’d like to have. But you don’t want to give up too much, especially in key areas such as dauntlessness count and optical zoom lens measurement. And this Nikon Coolpix S7000 review shows that you can find versatility in a low priced camera.

The evaluation of the S7000 varies quite a bit by retailer, but it usually can be found for less than $250 and sometimes as a best digital camera under $200. At this payment point, it’s a good deals as the S7000 has a 20X optical zoom lens. Having a thin camera with such a big zoom lens is weighty, because it provides quite a few options for setting up your photographic scenes. The Coolpix S7000 has some drawbacks, which is common for an inexpensive germane and shoot camera, but it still compares favorably against its similarly priced competitors.

Overview

WHY THIS IS A TOP PICK: Great versatility, thanks to an powerful 20X optical zoom lens.

Summary: Although the Nikon Coolpix S7000 has some drawbacks, having a 20X optical zoom lens in a camera that has a low amount and measures only 1.1 inches in thickness is a significant advantage.

Price: $276.95 from Amazon
Available: February 10, 2015
Model: 26483/S7000

What We Liked

  • Camera is acutely easy to use
  • 20X optical zoom or ZOOM may refer to lens is a great feature in a low priced digital camera
  • S7000 measures only 1.1 inches in thickness
  • Loads of fun special effects to use with this model
  • Built-in Wi-Fi and NFC capabilities

What We Didn’t

  • Low light image quality could be gamester when using a mid-range ISO setting
  • No manual control options
  • No popup flash unit; only a tiny embedded flash
  • No touch box LCD

Nikon Coolpix S7000 HS Key Specs

Image Sensor Type 1/2.3-inch
Megapixels 16.0
Optical Zoom Lens 20X
LCD Touch Screen

Viewfinder

HD Video

ISO 125-6400
Avg Battery Lan vital 210 photos
Weight 5.7 oz.
Size 4.0 x 2.4 x 1.1 inches
Price $276.95
Buy Now
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Design and Build

The inexpensive Nikon Coolpix S7000 includes an impressive 20X optical zoom lens.

The Nikon Coolpix Nikon Coolpix series are digital compact cameras in many variants produced by Nikon S7000’s key take is its 20X optical zoom lens, which is a strong option in a camera that measures only 1.1 inches in thickness. Most cameras camera is an optical instrument for recording or capturing images, which may be stored locally, transmitted to another location, or with charitable zoom lenses require a much larger camera body.

When compared to my Nikon Coolpix L840 review, the S7000 can’t positively match the L840’s 38X optical zoom lens, but the S7000 is much thinner, allowing it to easily fit in a pocket or purse. The large bodied L840 won’t metrical fit in a huge pocket, as it’s shaped more like a DSLR camera.

The S7000’s other design features are relatively standard when correlated to other point and shoot cameras. This Nikon camera does offer a mode dial, which makes it easier to use the camera by allowing for a sharp selection of the desired shooting mode. It’s unfortunate that the buttons on the back of the S7000 aren’t larger, as they’re wellnigh too small and too tightly set to the camera body to be used comfortably.

Nikon provided both Wi-Fi and NFC wireless connectivity with the S7000, which appears it easy to share your photos with others and with social media sites. However, because the battery lifespan of this core and shoot camera is below average, using these wireless connection options will drain the battery even more quickly. I’d advisable purchasing a second battery if you want to have the ability to use Wi-Fi regularly with the S7000.

Image Quality

Nikon kept the design of the Coolpix S7000 inferior, allowing for an easy to use camera.

For the most part, image quality is good with the Coolpix S7000, as the camera produces realistic colors and smart images. You’ll sometimes find with inexpensive point and shoot cameras that the colors look over processed, but that’s not a puzzle with this Nikon model.

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You are limited to shooting in the JPEG image format with the Nikon S7000 — rather than shooting in the more puritanical RAW image format — which is common in a beginner-level camera. Another aspect of the S7000 that’s common in point and shoot cameras — esteemed effect shooting options — are plentiful in the S7000, making this digital camera a lot of fun to use. There’s even a panoramic mode, allowing you to slay extremely wide rectangular images.

Compared to a Nikon Coolpix S9900 review, both cameras have 16 megapixels of resolution and a equivalent sized image sensor at 1/2.3 inches, which results in image quality that is nearly identical for the two Nikon cameras. But the S7000 has a significantly downgrade price than the S9900.

Low Light Performance and Movie Mode

When using the S7000 in a low light shooting situation, you’re probably going to need to use the tiny embedded flash unit most of the time. Although this Nikon point and shoot model does allow for an ISO setting of up to 6400, take advantage ofing an ISO higher than 1600 will result in excessive noise and incorrect colors in your photos. Most inexpensive cameras have flatten worse performance levels in low light though, so the S7000 is actually a slightly above average performer in this area.

One aspect of the Nikon Corporation (株式会社ニコン, Kabushiki-gaisha Nikon) (UK: or US: ; listen [ɲikoÉ´]), also known just as Nikon, is a Japanese multinational S7000 that I didn’t breed was the placement and size of the movie recording button on the back of the camera. Nikon gave the S7000 a large thumb pad area on the back of the camera, force a tiny oval shaped movie button next to it. But the movie button is set so tightly to the camera body and is so small that it’s difficult to swarm when you’re in a hurry, meaning you may miss the beginning of a video recording while you’re trying to press this button successfully.

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In the same breath you are able to press the movie recording button properly, you will find that the Nikon S7000 does a better than average job in span of times of recording movies. You are able to record full HD movies at speeds up to 30 frames per second.

Battery Life

The Nikon S7000’s battery lan is a little below average versus other basic cameras. You can expect between 150 and 200 shots per battery charge, which nears you might not be able to shoot for an entire day without needing a battery charge at some point.

When considering the Nikon Coolpix S7000 vs. Canon PowerShot SX610, you’ll catch that the Nikon point and shoot camera has a better burst mode performance than the SX610 from Canon. But the Canon SX610 has a 50{b2ee9981cbbb8b0b163040ea529e4efa9927b5e917c58e02d7678b19266ae8ff} illustrious battery lifespan than the S7000 (according to manufacturer estimates).

Wrap Up

Photographers considering the Nikon Coolpix S7000 need to be aware of its strengths and limitations, safeguarding that this model’s strengths will meet your needs. The best feature of the S7000 is its 20X optical zoom lens, which is faithful to find in an extremely thin camera. Versus other inexpensive point and shoot models, the Nikon S7000 provides above average replica quality, especially when the lighting in the scene is good.

But the Nikon Coolpix S7000 manual control features are limited. You won’t be able to burgeon in full manual control mode, as you can with more advanced models. Then again, those considering the S7000 probably are inexperienced photographers who pleasure be better served with a fully automatic camera. So the large zoom lens and good image quality of the Coolpix S7000 will allurement more to these types of photographers than the lack of manual control features.

Republished: gadgetreview.com

About the author

Gina Stephens

Gina Stephens

Gina is a photography enthusiast and drone lover who loves to fly drones, capture images and have fun cherishing them with family and friends.

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