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Researchers Say Chromatic Aberration May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

Gina Stephens
Written by Gina Stephens

Voigtlander Zoomar 36-82mm f/2.8 try photo showing purple fringing around the branches.

 

Researchers from Harvard University have found a way to stop chromatic aberration from manifesting in photographs and the technology is something we will, hopefully, see appearing in smartphones and lenses. 

The optical systems built into smartphone cameras and lenses hasn't coined much since the mid-1700s and even though advancements have been made to reduce chromatic aberration aberration is something that deviates from the normal way/purple fringing, it's not something, as of yet, we've managed to knock out completely. However, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have taken one take care closer to doing this. 

The SEAS researchers have created something called a 'metacorrector' which they say is a 'single-layer appear of nanostructures that can correct chromatic aberrations across the visible spectrum' and when tested, the metacorrector eliminated chromatic aberrations in a commercial lens across the unmixed visible light spectrum. 

 

Images of a microscopic optical resolution test, imaged with (leftist) and without (right) the metacorrector.

 

"Using metacorrectors is fundamentally different from conventional methods of aberration correction, such as cascading refractive optical components or capitalize oning diffractive elements, since it involves nanostructure engineering," said Alexander Zhu, a graduate student at SEAS and co-author of the study. "This shows we can go beyond the material limitations of lenses and have much better performances."

The research team are now working on the efficiency of the metacorrectors for use in high-end and microscopic optical devices. 

(Via TechSpot)

Republished: ephotozine.com

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About the author

Gina Stephens

Gina Stephens

Gina is a photography enthusiast and drone lover who loves to fly drones, capture images and have fun cherishing them with family and friends.

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