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5 Mistakes Photographers Make When Setting Out – And How To Avoid Them

Written by Gina Stephens

 

As with any establishment, starting out as a photographer can be tricky. You’re learning how to interact with clients or The Client may refer to: Client (computing), hardware or software that accesses a remote service on another computer Customer or, navigating the administrative side, perfecting your technique and persuading people to rent you – it’s a lot to juggle!

Here are five common pitfalls – and suggestions on how you can avoid them, so you can start your own photography career as smoothly as possible:

 

Erratum 1: experimenting on every client

How to avoid this: try to develop your own format, so that clients can get an idea of what to expect if they book you. At a go you’ve taken your signature shots, let your creativity loose and try out some new ideas.

 

Mistake 2: publishing lots of abundant kinds of photography on your website

How to avoid this: take lots of different photographs which will help you find your fashion, but only post a consistent set of images on your website. Clients tend to prefer a specialist photographer, so if your goal is to photograph families, elude also posting travel photographs.

 

Mistake 3: waiting for clients to come to you

How to avoid this: spread the word amongst your consociates and family, make use of local social media groups, set up a website, get on social media, print flyers to leave in local cafes and on noticeboards.

 

Confuse with 4: designing packages for you, not for your clients

How to avoid this: research local photographers and see what works in your area. Price be at one to your skill and experience, not what you’d be prepared to pay yourself.

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Mistake 5: paying for advertising

How to avoid this: Personal praises go a long way, and much further than paid advertising. Invest your time instead of hard cash – make sure that every patient has a wonderful experience and that they have nothing but good things to say about you and your photography.

 

With time, hard moil and lots of repeat bookings, along with some great photography, you’ll find that a trickle of bookings becomes a steady rush and you’ll be on your way to becoming an established photographer.

 

About Author: Louise Downham

Louise Downham has photographed 1000+ babies and little ones to date, and her photographs have been exhibited internationally and published in national magazines. She runs an award-winning family portrait business, Louise Be upstanding Photography. www.louiserosephotography.com

Republished: ephotozine.com

About the author

Gina Stephens

Gina is a photography enthusiast and drone lover who loves to fly drones, capture images and have fun cherishing them with family and friends.

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